Category Archives: Research

Astragalus: is this ancient Chinese herb the Telomere-Enabler of the Future?

 

 

via Astragalus: is this ancient Chinese herb the Telomere-Enabler of the Future? – ImmortalLife.net.

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BBC News – Bacteria find key to treating obesity without surgery

 

In the latest study, researchers compared three groups of obese mice on a high-calorie diet.

  • One group was given a gastric bypass
  • One was given a sham operation, and the high-calorie diet continued
  • One was given the same fake operation but then fed a low-calorie diet to promote weight loss

A week later the mice who had undergone the real obesity surgery had different bacteria in their guts, with an increase in types usually seen in lean individuals and a drop in types associated with obesity.

Three weeks after surgery they had lost about 30% of their bodyweight, the researchers reported in Science Translational Medicine.

There was little change in micro-organisms present in the mice who had had sham operations, even though the group on the low-calorie diet lost just as much weight as the mice who had had the bypass surgery.

Metabolism impact

Researchers then transferred samples from the guts of the three groups of mice into other germ-free mice.

Those who received bacteria from the bypass mice, lost a significant amount of weight in two weeks but the others saw no change.

It is not yet clear how the microbes influence weight loss, but one theory is that they have an impact on metabolism.

via BBC News – Bacteria find key to treating obesity without surgery.

Mechanisms of aluminum adjuvant toxicit – PubMed Mobile

What are the long term effects of auto-immunity (auto inflammation) on longevity?

via Mechanisms of aluminum adjuvant toxicit – PubMed Mobile.

Young Blogger and his 6 year experience following the CRON Diet

 

Pretty amazing results in the studies listed in this article. Restricting calories has increased longevity in every species tested. We now have a sector of the human population voluntarily undertaking the experiment on themselves. Simply eating smaller portions makes a huge difference in our caloric intake, but the CRON diet is “Caloric Restriction” WITH “Optimal Nutrition”. This makes better sense than simply cutting your calories down by 1/3 or more. Super promising solution to the ageing problem until we are able to develop nano- and bio-tech to move us into healthy triple digits and beyond.

Young Blogger and his 6 year experience following the CRON Diet.

Antibiotics disrupt gut flora in infants: Recovery still incomplete after eight weeks

Eight weeks after antibiotic treatment of infants, the diversity of gastrointestinal flora remained diminished, although the number of individual bacteria was back to normal, according to a paper in the November 2012 issue of the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. Additionally, the potentially disease-causing Proteobacteria were now the d

via Antibiotics disrupt gut flora in infants: Recovery still incomplete after eight weeks.

Researchers quantify how many years of life are gained by being physically active

In a new study from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, researchers have quantified how many years of life are gained by being physically active at different levels, among all individuals as well as among various groups with different body mass index.

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-11-quantify-years-life-gained-physically.html#jCp

via Researchers quantify how many years of life are gained by being physically active.

Omega-3s: Fishing for a Mechanism

Mithridates VI, king of Pontus and Armenia Minor in northern Anatolia (now Turkey) from about 120 BC to 63 BC, was a forward-thinking and perceptive individual who understood that a little bit of stress can be a good thing. Terrified of succumbing to the same fate as his father, who was assassinated by poisoning at his own banquet, Mithridates began ingesting sublethal doses of poisons to develop immunity to them, a real-life example of The Princess Bride’s Westley.

The benefit of this practice, which in modern times is known as “hormesis,” is believed to stem from the fact that in low, subtoxic amounts, poisons, toxins, and other types of stress will upregulate antioxidants and detoxification enzymes in the liver, heart, and other major organs, thereby augmenting the natural ability of the body to detoxify and protect itself against future exposure to those same toxins. Could that be what’s happening with n-3 PUFAs in the heart? Could the highly reactive oxidized products generated from PUFA oxidation cause adaptations in the heart—such as biochemical/biophysical alterations in membranes and the upregulation of cardio-protective genes—that subsequently protect the vital organ against disease and stress?

via Omega-3s: Fishing for a Mechanism | The Scientist Magazine®.

via Omega-3s: Fishing for a Mechanism | The Scientist Magazine®.

BBC News – Low calcium hormone disease risk

Having too little calcium in the diet increases womens risk of a hormone condition that can cause bone fractures and kidney stones, scientists suggest.

via BBC News – Low calcium hormone disease risk.

New study finds brain tumors can arise from neurons

The new research shows that tumors can in fact have their origins in several types of differentiated cells in the central nervous system, including neural stem cells, astrocytes (a sub-type of glial cell) and even neurons, when cancer-causing genes are introduced. Neurons do not divide, but when the genes were introduced they were found to transform into stem cells that could reproduce rapidly.

via New study finds brain tumors can arise from neurons.

via New study finds brain tumors can arise from neurons.

Why getting physically stronger will help you live longer

S

trength is a key factor in longevity and an extended healthy life. And in fact, resistance training may be the single most important thing you can add to your fitness regimen. Here’s how getting stronger will make you harder to kill.

 

via Why getting physically stronger will help you live longer.

Stanford researchers create tiny, wirelessly powered cardiac device

One big problem we have with bio-implantable devices, like cardiac implants, is that they require a battery–and batteries need to be changed once in a while. This means more surgery. 

In this day and age of wireless devices, it seems like

 a no-brainer to choose to power the devices wirelessly. So what’s been holding us up?

It turns out, the existing models told researchers that radio waves couldn’t penetrate deeply enough into human tissue to be useful for power delivery. The human body is a poor conductor of electricity. Ultimately, it took someone willing to question the accepted models, to show that it could, in fact, be done.

By ignoring the currently held ideas of “that isn’t possible”, Ada Poon and her team showed that radio waves can travel in a different way– and by doing so, they can be used as a wireless source for power delivery; in fact, using this method, it is actually advantageous that human tissue is such a poor electrical conductor.

“In this high-frequency range, we can increase power transfer by about 10 times over earlier devices,” said Ho, who honed the mathematical models.

Two hurdles remained:
1) how to use this wireless delivery safely to avoid unnecessary tissue heating
2) how to orient the antennas for maximum efficiency in the constantly moving environment of a human body.

Differences in alignment of just a few degrees could produce troubling drops in power.

“This can’t happen medical devices,” said Poon. “As the human heart and body are in constant motion, solving this issue was critical to the success of our research.” The team responded by designing an innovative slotted transmitting antenna structure. It delivers consistent power efficiency regardless of orientation of the two antennas.

The new design serves additionally to focus the radio waves precisely at the point inside the body where the implanted device rests on the surface of the heart – increasing the electric field where it is needed most, but canceling it elsewhere. This helps reduce overall tissue heating to levels well within the IEEE standards. Poon has applied for a patent on the antenna structure.”

via Stanford researchers create tiny, wirelessly powered cardiac device | Stanford News Release.

Arsenic in Rice? Yes, Especially Brown Rice – AARP

Yes, it is true. And it is due to the pesticides and insecticides we put on our soil. Shame on us for continuing such an idiotic practice. Two alternatives are suggested:

1) cook your rice the traditional Asian way with 6 cups water to 1 cup rice. You loose nutrients to the water this way, but you also lose about 30% of the arsenic in the hull of brown rice.

2) eat quinoa

via Arsenic in Rice? Yes, Especially Brown Rice – AARP.

Woman Grows a New Ear on Her Arm, Has It Attached to Her Head (Warning: Graphic)

Woman Grows New Ear on Her Arm, Then Has It Attached to Her Head
(Warning: this article might be a little “eewww” for some people)

Remember the mouse with ear grown on its back? Now, researchers used a woman’s own rib cartilage to grow a w

oman a new ear–first on her arm, then they removed it from her arm and attached to her head. The photos show the ear still swollen, but they anticipate it will look pretty normal once the swelling subsides.

via Woman Grows a New Ear on Her Arm, Has It Attached to Her Head (Warning: Graphic).

Antibiotic oomph: the eyes have it

Researchers noticed it was nearly impossible to infect a healthy eye, so they set about discovering what was so good at fighting off infections. What they found was a keratin protein which may lead to even better means of dealing with some of our worst infectious pathogens like flesh-eating strep.

via Antibiotic oomph: the eyes have it.

Brain Neurons and Diet Influence Onset of Obesity and Diabetes in Mice | Neuroscience News

The absence of a specific type of neuron in the brain can lead to obesity and diabetes in mice report researchers in The EMBO Journal. The outcome, however, depends on the type of diet that the animals are fed.

via Brain Neurons and Diet Influence Onset of Obesity and Diabetes in Mice | Neuroscience News.

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